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Archbishop Germanos of Patra .

Germanos. Friedal, Adam de Germanos. "Germanos Archbishop of Palaion (old) Patras" London & Paris " now in course of Publication...by A Friedal, sold by the principal Book & Printsellers in Town & Country." 1827
Coloured lithograph portrait of Germanos from the fourth edtion of Friedals "Series of Greek Portraits (4th part)" verso blank. Original old colour. Printed signature in Greek. Text in English and French.
Portrait of Metrolopis Germanos of Patras, with full background .
Georgios Ioannou Kozias, 1771-1826
In 1818 he became a member of the "Society of Friends" (Filiki Hetairia), which was seeking independence for the Greek nation from the Ottoman yoke.
On March 13 1821, a Sunday, Germanos blessed the standard during the liturgy at Agia Lavra Monastery in Achaea, and on March 25 1821, blessed the fighters at Agia Lavra and hoisted the flag of the Greek War of Independence in St. George's Square at Patrai.
Germanos left Greece in 1822 for Italy, in an abortive mission hoping to obtain aid and support for the war effort from the Pope and the European Congress at Verona, but returned in 1824 without having seen him. Brightly colour, margins evenly toned with light spotting.
Navari/ Blackmer: 633; Sotheby's/Blackmer:606; 440 by 325mm (17¼ by 12¾ inches) full page.    €500
Stock No. 1922 - Philhellenic full description

Joannis Kollettis.

Johannis Collettis. Friedal, Adam de Johannis Collettis. "Johannis Collettis, Minister of the Interior & Member of the Executive Body in Greece". London " In course of Publication in London by A. Friedal & sold by the principal book & printsellers in town & Country." August 1826
Black & white lithograph portrait of Johannes Kollettis from the second edtion of Friedals "Series of Greek Portraits (2nd part)" verso blank.
The portrait bust, shows Collettis in fur trimmed coat; printed signature in Greek.
Ioannis Kolettis (1773 - 1847) was a Greek politician who played a significant role in Greek affairs from the Greek War of Independence through the early years of the Greek Kingdom. Kolettis was born in Syrrako, Epirus and played a leading role in the political life of the Greek state in the 1830s and 1840s. Kolettis was of Vlach origin and studied medicine in Pisa, Italy and was influenced by the Carbonari movement and started planning his return to Epirus in order to participate in Greece's independence struggles.
In 1813, he settled at Ioannina, where he served as a doctor and after gaining standing he was recruited as the personal doctor of Ali Pacha's son, Muqtar Pacha. He remained in Ioannina till March 1821, when he entered Filiki Eteria and left for Syrrako, together with chieftain Raggos, in order to spread the revolution into Central Greece but his efforts quickly failed because of the rapid reaction of the Ottoman army. Kolettis was the leader of the pro-French party and based his power on his relations with the leaders of Central Greece but also on his ability to eliminate his adversaries by acting behind the scenes.
He was Prime Minister of Greece in 1834-5 & again in 1844-7. Clean and bright; light spotting.
Navari/ Blackmer: 633; Sotheby's/Blackmer:606; 450 by 316mm (17¾ by 12½ inches)full page.    €450
Stock No. 1917 - Philhellenic full description

Lykourgos Logothetis.

John Logotheti. Friedal, Adam de John Logotheti. "John Logotheti Senator of the Executive Body in Greece". London " In course of Publication in London by A. Friedal & sold by the principal book & printsellers in town & Country." June 1826
Black & white lithograph portrait of John' Lykourgos' Logothetes from the second edtion of Friedals "Series of Greek Portraits (2nd part)" verso blank.
The portrait bust, shows Logothetis, seated holding a document and spectacles. Printed signature in Greek.
Logothetis real name Georgios Paplomatas was born in Samos in 1772; after studying in Constantinople he moved to Wallachia where he became secratary to Constantine Ypsilantisand later to to Alexander Soutsos as Logotheti. Eventually returned to Constaninople and finally to Samos, but due to polical fights was forced in to, exile on Mont Athos. He was to return after 6 years, but again fell foul of his opponents and was condemned to death; escaping to Smyna where he joined the Filiki Eteria. In 1821 at the start of the Greek revolution Lycurgus returned to Samos, where residents welcomed him as savior and declared him a political and military leader of the island. His military and organizational skills resulted in the successful repulse of three raids against Samos in 1821, 1824 and 1826. He was also part of the failed rebellion on neighbouring Chios in March 1822.
After the success of the Greek revolution. In 1828, the island became formally incorporated into the Hellenic State under Governor Ioannis Kapodistrias, as part of the province of the Eastern Sporades, but the London Protocol of 1830 excluded Samos from the borders of the independent Greek state.
The Samians refused to accept their re-subordination to the Sultan, and Logothetis declared Samos to be an independent state, governed as before under the provisions of the 1821 constitution. Finally, due to the pressure of the Great Powers, Samos was declared an autonomous, tributary principality under Ottoman suzerainty. The Samians still refused to accept this decision until an Ottoman fleet enforced it in May 1834, forcing the revolutionary leadership and a part of the population to flee to independent Greece, where they settled near Chalkis. Logothetis moved to Athens where he was honoured by the Greek State and became a Senator. He died in 1850. Clean and bright; light spoting.
Navari/ Blackmer: 633; Sotheby's/Blackmer:606; 450 by 316mm (17¾ by 12½ inches)full page    €400
Stock No. 1918 - Philhellenic full description

Papaflessas.

Pappa Flesh. Friedal, Adam de Pappa Flesh. "Pappa Flesh. Late minister of War in the Greek Government." London & Paris " now in course of Publication...by A Friedal, sold by the principal Book & Printsellers in Town & Country." 1827
Coloured lithograph portrait of Papaflessas from the fourth edtion of Friedals "Series of Greek Portraits (4th part)" verso blank. Original old colour. Printed signature in Greek. Text in English and French.
Portrait of Papaflessas in helmet with full background.

Georgios Dimitrios Flessas ,1788–1825.
From an early age Papaflesss came in to conflict with the Ottoman Turks, and was active in trying to raise resistence against them. Papaflessas traveled to several areas seeking support for a revolution against the Ottoman Empire.
At Kalamata on March 21 1821 where he had arranged armed men around the city following the arrest of leading Greeks and clergy a Turkish sympathizer tried to leave the city and was killed, starting the war of Independence on March 21, 1821. In Mani a gathering of the captains of the rebels had decided to start the revolution on March 25, 1821, but received news on the 22nd that the fighting had already begun. The Greek War of Independence officially started on March 25, 1821.

1823, Papaflessas was named the Minister of Internal Affairs and the Chief of Police by the government of Prince Alexander Mavrocordato under the name Gregorios Dikaios, the name he had when was in Filiki Etairia.

When Ibrahim Pasha invaded the Peloponnese in 1825 Realizing the great danger the nation was facing with the Ibrahim's invasion, he demanded the government grant amnesty to Kolokotronis and other political prisoners. This demand was refused and he appeared before the Executive Branch and Parliament to tell them he would go to Messinia alone to organize a resistance against Ibrahim, determined to return victorious or die in the battlefield.

Papaflessas gathered 3,000 poorly armed men and went to the province of Pylia, Messinia, searching for the best spot to face Ibrahim's army coming out of the city of Pylos. He selected the hills of Maniaki in order for him to have a better view of the enemy's movements and there Papaflessas established three lines of defence. On June 1, 1825, Ibrahim's forces led by well-trained French officers attacked Papaflessas' defence lines. Most of the Greek troops lost their nerve, abandoned their positions, and fled. Papaflessas continued to fight the Egyptians with a small force of 800-1000 men loyal to him and his cause.

Papaflessas knew that in choosing to face Ibrahim he would die on the battlefield. Papaflessas's defenses were ultimately broken by the heavy bombardment of Ibrahim's artillery and the repeated attacks of his infantry and cavalry. Fierce hand-to-hand fighting ended with the death of the last defender.

After Papaflessa's death from a bullet in the chest, Ibrahim ordered that his body be cleaned of blood and dirt and tied to a tree. After a few minutes of looking at his foe, Ibrahim walked up to the corpse and kissed it on the cheek as a sign of extreme respect. In speaking of Papaflessas after his death, it is said that Ibrahim told his officers: "If Greece had ten heroes like him, it would not have been possible for me to undertake the military campaign against the Peloponnese". Brightly colour, margins evenly toned with light spotting.
Navari/ Blackmer: 633; Sotheby's/Blackmer:606; 440 by 325mm (17¼ by 12¾ inches) full page.    €600
Stock No. 1923 - Philhellenic full description

Petro Mavromichaeli.

Prince Petro Mavro Michaeli. Friedal, Adam de Prince Petro Mavro Michaeli. "Prince Petro Mavro Michaeli. Chief of the Maniottes, or old Spartans President of the Executive body of the Greek Government in 1823". London "Drawn from life and Pub.d in London by A Friedal." 1826
Black & white lithograph portrait of Petro MavroMichlaeli from the second edtion of Friedals "Series of Greek Portraits" verso blank.
Portrait bust; printed signature in Greek.
Petros "Mavromichalis" Pierrakos (1765 – 1848), also known as Petrobey, In 814, the Maniots again became a threat to the Ottomans, and the Sultan offered a number of concessions to Pierrakos, including his being named Bey, or Chieftain, of Mani - in effect formalizing the de facto status of autonomy the region had maintained for years.In 1818, he became a member of the Filiki Eteria, On March 17, 1821, Petrobey raised his war flag in Areopolis, effectively signaling the start of the Greek War of Independence. His troops marched into Kalamata, and took the city on March 23. Some light spotting.
Navari/ Blackmer: 633; Sotheby's/Blackmer:606; 450 by 316mm (17¾ by 12½ inches)full page.    €700
Stock No. 1916 - Philhellenic full description

Staikos Staikopoulos

Staikos. Giovanni Boggi Levilly after Boggi. Staikos. "Staîco, dessine d'apres nature par Boggi." Paris "chez P Marino, Editeur, rue Montmorency, No 15." c1825
Original coloured lithograph of by Giovanni Boggi of Staikos Staikopoulos. from his "Portraits of Protagonists in the Greek Revolutions" Second editon?. title in Greek & Italian. Verso blank.

Staikos Staikopoulos1799-1835

Staikopoulos was born at Zatouna, Gortynia, in Arcadia and from an early age was involved in the fur trade. On the island of Hydra, where he went in 1818, he was recruited to the Filiki Eteria, by Nikolaos Speliotopoulos.
In 1821, upon the outbreak of the war, he raised his own company of troops and departed Hydra for Argos. He began at once a siege of Nafplio and quickly turned one of its commanders to his side.
At last on 29 November 1822, along with Demetrios Moschonesios, he took the fortress of Palamidi, the feat for which he is best remembered in the history books. Afterwards he was promoted from chiliarch to strategos (general).
Following this he laid siege to the fort of Corinth, which fell under his occupation. He was the first to face Ibrahim Pasha, from whom he took thirty prisoners, who were sent to Nafplio. He had a seat in the Second National Assembly at Astros .
An opponent of the government of King Otto he was imprisoned at Nafplion He died on 21 February 1835, the day of his release from prison, in the guardhouse of Leonardou in Nafplio, from the wounds and hardships of war, and was buried in the old city cemetery. Scattered light spotting; repaired tear [30mm] to right edge.
300 by 230mm (11¾ by 9 inches) full page.    €250
Stock No. 1945 - Philhellenic full description

King Otto at Megera.

Ruined palace at Megera where King Otto I of Greece with his brother Crown prince Maximillian stayed on their journey to Athens .... 10-22 May 1833 Gustav Kraus Ruined palace at Megera where King Otto I of Greece with his brother Crown prince Maximillian stayed on their journey to Athens .... 10-22 May 1833 " Palast Ruine zu Megera, in welcher König Otto I von Griechenland mit seinen Bruder dem Kronprinzen Max von Bayern auf der Reise nach Athen in Mitte seiner Getreuen übernachtete, am 10/22 May 1833." Munich Gustav Kraus. c1835
Black & white lithograph of King Otto at Megera in 1833, by Gustav Kraus. Formerly laid down to thicker paper, remains on verso, some creasing and spotting to margins
315 by 400mm (12½ by 15¾ inches) full page.    €600
Stock No. 1944 - Philhellenic full description

Andreas Miaoulis

<em>A. Miaulis beats the Turkish fleet at Kos.</em> HESS, PETER VON. "A. Miaulis beats the Turkish fleet at Kos." Munich H. Kohler c1835
Tinted lithograph, as issued, of Andreas Miaoulis, from Peter von Hess's Album of Greek Heroism, or the Deliverance of Greece / Griechenlands Befreiung ... in XXXIX Bildern.[ First edition.] within decorative borders incorporating captions in Greek, German, French & English. The borders are decorated with guns, swords and helmets with the Greek flag to the left; on the right a crucifix and other emblems of the Christian church; at the top Turkish weapons, laid down, with a fez ,and below, sails and naval instruments
The image shows Miaoulis on board ship after the Naval Battle of Gerontas which took place near Kos and Leros, at the end of August, 1824.

The two fleets first engaged in battle on August 24 between Kos and Alicarnassus. The following day was marked by very poor weather which caused the Greek fleet to take refuge in the Gulf of Gerontas.
On August 29, 1824, the main battle was fought between Leros and the coast of Asia Minor. The Greeks, making use of their fireships destroyed some 30 enemy ships and sent the rest fleeing towards Alikarnassos (Bodrum). Many officers were taken prisoner including the commander of the Tunisian fleet. Eventually, the Egyptian fleet retired to Crete while the Turkish fleet returned to the Dardanelles.

Andreas Vokos, nicknamed Miaoulis (1768 – 1835),
was an admiral and politician who commanded Greek naval forces during the Greek War of Independence (1821-1829).
Miaoulis, who was of Arvanite origin, was born in Euboea and settled on the island of Hydra east of the Morea and was known among his fellow islanders as a trader in corn who had gained wealth and made a popular use of his money. He had been a merchant captain, and was chosen to lead the naval forces of the islands when they rose against the government of the Sultan. Miaoulis contributed in every way possible to the cause of the resistance against the Turks. He expended the money he had made from his wheat-shipping business during the Napoleonic Wars.
Between May 1825 and January 1826,Miaoulis led the Greeks to victory over the Turks in skirmishes off Modon, Cape Matapan, Suda, and Cape Papas.
As early as 1822 Miaoulis was appointed navarch, (Greek: Νάυαρχος) or admiral, of the swarm of small vessels which formed the insurgent fleet. He commanded the expedition sent to take revenge for the massacre of Chios in the same year. He was victorious at the Battle of Nauplia in September.

In 1824, after the conquest of Psara by the Turks, he commanded the Greek forces which prevented the further progress of the Sultan's fleet, though at the cost of the loss of many fire ships and men. But in the same year he was unable to prevent the Egyptian forces from occupying Navarino, though he harassed them with some success. In 1825 he succeeded in carrying stores and reinforcements into Missolonghi, when it was besieged for the second time, though he could not avert its fall.

When independence had been obtained, Miaoulis in his old age was entangled in the civil conflicts of his country, as an opponent of Capodistrias and the Russian Party : he seized some of the principal ships of the Greek fleet at Poros in August 1831, including the Hellas, and destroyed them during the counter-attack of the Russian fleet.

He was one of the deputation sent to invite King Otho to accept the crown of Greece, and was made rear-admiral and then vice-admiral by him. Otto also awarded him with the Grand Cross of the Order of the Redeemer. Image bright and clean; light spotting to blank borders; tear [repaired] to lower margin.
Not in Blackmer ,Droulia or Contominas. 540 by 410mm (21¼ by 16¼ inches)full page.    €850
Stock No. 1929 - Philhellenic full description

Andreas Metaxas.

<em>A.Metaxas beating the Turks near Lala</em>. HESS, PETER VON. "A.Metaxas beating the Turks near Lala." Munich H. Kohler c1835
Tinted lithograph, with modern colour, of Andreas Metaxas at Lala, from Peter von Hess's Album of Greek Heroism, or the Deliverance of Greece / Griechenlands Befreiung ... in XXXIX Bildern.[ First edition.] within decorative borders incorporating captions in Greek, German, French & English. The borders are decorated with guns, swords and helmets with the Greek flag to the left; on the right a crucifix and other emblems of the Christian church; at the top Turkish weapons, laid down, with a fez ,and below, sails and naval instruments.

Andreas Metaxas, was born in Kefalonia in 1790.
With about 300 men, and with the allied troops from the Peloponnese he and his cousin Konstantinos Metaxas freed the village of Lala, in Ilia, on June 24, 1821. Image bright and clean; light spotting to blank borders.
Not in Blackmer ,Droulia or Contominas. 540 by 425mm (21¼ by 16¾ inches) full page.    €650
Stock No. 1936 - Philhellenic full description

The Fall of Patras to Kanakaris.

<em>Ath. Kanakaris is taking possession of the town of Patras.</em> HESS, PETER VON. "Ath. Kanakaris is taking possession of the town of Patras." Munich H. Kohler c1835
Tinted lithograph, with modern colour, of Athanasios Kanakaris taking Patras, from Peter von Hess's Album of Greek Heroism, or the Deliverance of Greece / Griechenlands Befreiung ... in XXXIX Bildern.[ First edition.] within decorative borders incorporating captions in Greek, German, French & English. The borders are decorated with guns, swords and helmets with the Greek flag to the left; on the right a crucifix and other emblems of the Christian church; at the top Turkish weapons, laid down, with a fez, and below, sails and naval instruments.

The Greek revolution was declared in Patras on March 25 1821, however the Turks retreated to the citadel and would remain there until the city was liberated on 7 October 1828 by the French expeditionary force in the Peloponnese, under the command of General Maison. It is possible that Hess is trying to re write history by suggesting that the birthplace of the revolution was liberated by a Greek force; it certainly seems that politics were heavily involved in the image. Image bright and clean; light spotting to blank borders.
Not in Blackmer ,Droulia or Contominas. 540 by 413mm (21¼ by 16¼ inches) full page.    €650
Stock No. 1940 - Philhellenic full description


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Company: Bryan, Mary Louise. Address: 6 Alikarnassou Street, 21100 Nafplion, Greece.
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